Information
NOTE: The following description is a GENERAL Overview of this career and not a description of a particular job posting.

Marine Welders are skilled laborers who use a variety of equipment and methods to permanently join together various metal parts. Marine Welders will typically perform manual welding procedures using Shielded Metal Arc welding (SMAW) or Oxy-Acetylene torches, or use semiautomatic systems such as wire feeder machines. Marine Welders must be able to set up and use this equipment in a variety of positions (such as flat, vertical, horizontal, and overhead). Marine Welding methods include Arc, Metal Inert Gas (MIG), Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG), Submerged Arc, Carbon Arc, and Gas (Oxy-Acetylene). Certified Marine Welders must be able to perform pre- and post-heating, induction heating, surface hardening, stress relieving, and welding inspections. Skilled welders will also perform soldering and brazing operations. Standard metals that Marine Welders join together include all types of steels, aluminum, copper, monel, copper-nickel, bronzes, and cast iron. Each level of skilled Marine Welder (3rd, 2nd, 1st) will require Quality Assurance (QA) certifications.
Compensation
National Median wages (2010): $17.04 hourly, $35,450 annual

VSRA Median Wage Report: $19.82 hourly
VSRA Welder Entry-level/Helper: $12.00-$13.00 hourly
Education
Typically, Marine Welding careers require a high school diploma.
Qualifications
Typically, the ideal Marine Welding candidate will possess:
- Previous job experience, particularly in a maritime setting
- Basic trade knowledge, such as the use of job related tools and equipment
- A strong work ethic (flexible, reliable, punctual)